We’ll Follow the Sun

It has turned cold in Washington, D.C. and I am so very ready to head south for the winter. There are more leaves on the ground then on the branches.  Hopefully, Scout II will have the necessary repairs done this coming week, so Maggie and I can hit the road.   I have very little in the way of winter clothing, and I certainly don’t want to buy turtle necks and sweaters. 

Our delayed departure and colder temperatures are making changes to our travel plans.   After Thanksgiving we will head south to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, or farther south.   I hope the weather in early December allows me to play some golf.  Our goal is not to be in weather below 55 degrees anywhere this winter.

The beauty of an RV is you can adjust your travels to follow the sun, and avoid rain and cold (regardless of a very nice heater in the Airstream).  That’s exactly what we will be doing this winter, following the sun. 

Counter top and drawers!

All the while getting comfortable with new Scout, more space and new features of a solar panel on the roof, and a backup camera on the rear.

I also need to install a truck bed cover for the new Toyota Tacoma pick-up truck, so I can hide my golf clubs and pull cart, which will give Maggie more room in her new back seat.

The solar panel offers longer battery power.  However, we try to stay in places with electric and water hook-up.  I enjoy the comradery of a campground, rather than the isolation of “boondocking”, which is the term for camping out in the boonies; on public lands in the middle of nowhere, without water or electric, and no port-a-potty in sight. 

I did lot’s of remote camping in Alaska.

Nellie Martin US Forest Service Cabin

Beach at Patton Bay, Alask

Years ago, I spent an August week alone on Montague Island in Prince William Sound, walking the 2 miles of beach and catching silver salmon on a fly rod.  Flying from Anchorage in my stepfather’s Cessna 172 and landing on the beach.  My pals Barbara and Howard were suppose to come with me, but Howard broke his ankle playing softball the week before.  It was an amazing week of sunshine and unusually warm weather.  At week’s end I looked like I had spent a week in Hawaii, and not on a beach in Alaska.

Later I cooked at a fishing lodge on the Yetna River for the month of July during the king salmon run.  It was an unusual vacation waking at 5 a.m. to cook breakfast and get the fishermen out on the river, making lunches for the guides to take along, and cooking dinner at 10 p.m. after the fishing had closed.  I was alone at the lodge with 3 dogs during the day and enjoyed the solitude.   I was never armed with any guns.  While I saw bears in the distance, I was fortunate to never have a close encounter on Montague or the Ketna.

Needless to say I gave up tent camping after my 20’s.  I prefer a cabin, lodge and now an Airstream.